Who was Katzir Hanna? 76-year-old Israeli hostage dies from medical complications

The Palestinian gathering Islamic Jihad reported late on Tuesday the demise of one of the Israeli prisoners
76-y-old Israeli prisoner Katzir Hanna has died from unexpected issues
On November 9, they said they could deliver her as she really wants day to day existence saving drug

Late on Tuesday, the Palestinian gathering Islamic Jihad announced the demise of one of the Israeli prisoners it had been holding since the assaults on Israel on October 7. The declaration was made by the Al Quds Units on its Wire channel, expressing that they had recently shown an eagerness to deliver her for philanthropic reasons. In any case, they asserted that the postponement and hesitance with respect to the foe (alluding to Israel) to take part in exchanges or answer their circumstances eventually brought about the disastrous result of her demise. The conditions encompassing the prisoner circumstance and the subtleties of the singular’s passing were not given in the explanation. The circumstance mirrors the continuous pressures in the locale and the difficulties related with discussions between contradicting groups.

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Up to seven octogenarians, including 85 year-old Yaffa Adar, might be among the prisoners held hostage. Yaffa, an occupant of the Nir Oz kibbutz who lived alone and needed support for everyday undertakings, was captured being removed by equipped people in a golf truck after the seizure. In spite of the disrupting conditions, Yaffa’s formed at this point ambiguous articulation in the pictures stands apart as a strong image of the unfurling emergency.

Adva Adar, Yaffa’s granddaughter, underscored Yaffa’s versatility, expressing, “They won’t see her embarrassed or frightened or hurt. She will allow them to see that she’s an individual.” Adva communicated her bewilderment at the circumstance, addressing how somebody could enter the home of a 85 year-elderly person, without any ability to hurt or safeguard herself, and decide to kidnap her. The absence of essential sympathy in such a situation stays immense to her.

The stories of the old prisoners weave an embroidery interfacing the current misfortune to Israel’s wild history. 84 year-old Ditza Haiman, a resigned social laborer and supposedly a prisoner from Nir Oz, is the widow of Zvi Shdaimah, a Kindertransport survivor who got away from Nazi-controlled Europe. 75 year-old Alexander Dancyg, the child of Holocaust survivors in Poland, went through a long time at Yad Vashem in Jerusalem, advancing Israeli-Clean discourse. Shoshan Haran, a 67 year-old plant scholar purportedly kidnapped from the Be’eri kibbutz, established Fair Planet, an association circulating seeds in the Worldwide South. These convincing biographies highlight the profound and different associations between the prisoners and Israel’s verifiable and social texture.